Canada’s ‘meaningful’ climate action brought under scrutiny by report

Canada will likely miss its 2020 greenhouse gas emissions reductions target by almost a third according to latest analysis by Canadian environmental think-tank the Pembina Institute.

At the recent Durban UN climate change conference, Federal Environment Minister Peter Kent referred to Canada’s ‘meaningful action’ on climate change and the government’s targets to reduce its greenhouse gas emissions 17 percent below 2005 levels by 2020 as the government sought to negotiate a global climate agreement that included all major emitters.

However, Pembina’s report ‘Responsible Action’ indicates that their projected shortfall in Alberta’s provincial target would actually reduce Canada’s mitigation ambitions to 12 percent below 2005 levels by 2020, assuming the government is successful in reducing its emissions elsewhere.

Kent has frequently underlined Canada’s commitment to the Copenhagen Accord, and declared in his recent Ministerial declaration speech in Durban that “Kyoto is in the past.” On Monday, Kent announced Canada would withdraw from the Kyoto Protocol whose targets of reducing emissions 6 percent below 1990 levels by 2012 it abandoned reaching in 2007.

Under the 2009 Copenhagen Accord, world leaders agreed to limit the increase in average global temperatures to no more than 2 degrees Celsius in order to prevent serious climate change, a target that the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change states would require global emissions to stabilize at 450 parts per million by volume before being reduced by at least 50 percent by 2050.

Pembina’s projected emissions shortfall for Alberta would likely mean Canada’s emissions would be almost 13 percent above 1990 levels in 2020.


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